Technical Information for Innovation

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The generation of technical information implies great and continuous investments, restricted in distribution amongst collaborators in organisations. Often the product of these investments are shelved too soon or processed away from the eyes and ears of experienced practical people, that are not the typical target for this information.   These

The generation of technical information implies great and continuous investments, restricted in distribution amongst collaborators in organisations. Often the product of these investments are shelved too soon or processed away from the eyes and ears of experienced practical people, that are not the typical target for this information.

 

These people, usually working at operational levels, hold important potential sources of innovation through divergent approaches to the use of this information. However, their differential backgrounds mean that communicating this information, in the form of typical reports etc does not lead to a sufficient understanding of the value of the information. Potential knowledge is also halted when that information does not percolate to lower levels of the organisation, or it does so in a way that does not allow it to be applied to practical tasks, and thus it is lost. Instead, it should be tailored to the needs and learning styles of these personnel.

 

One of the main approaches to the topic is delivery of products that can make an impact upon people, rather than from typical convenience of information processing.   It is often thought that people should adapt to how information is given to them, instead of providing it in a format that is relevant to them. The research is centred on delivering a conversation strategy for technical information that could elevate it to a human resources tool, and thus support its innovation potential.

 

While the concept and distribution of tailored information is of paramount importance, the final objective is to trigger the after-effect of propelling creative thinking in a comfortable context in which trust and feeling of belonging have been expressed through open and mindful sharing of that information.

 

A possible solution

This research explores how a relationship network can be built between different communication parameters and organisational competencies, so that strategies can be built and planned easily in accordance with people’s profiles.

In a practical field, this proposed framework allows for information to be shaped and modified to fill the requirements of different people or different collectives, so that information can be used as a catalyst towards innovation dynamics.

 

Use and reflection

The framework explores the physical tool of playing cards that introduce adaptability to set out these communication strategies. It simplifies the process of tailoring technical information by displaying simple relationships between communication and competencies, so that it can be used in various contexts to address both individual and group communication.

 

This tool also allows a fair degree of reflection inwards, and easily demonstrates communication protocols that can evolve over time.

 

The research is an initial approach that is offering organisational awareness and conscious identification of how the shape and type of media used to communicate has an effect of technical perception and the understanding of business models. This framework can be used as a platform for interaction between human resources dynamics and technical pursuits so that, differently from actual organisational practices, they can work together to produce not only economical benefits from existing investments, but social return and collective growth.