Who am I?

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Of a Saturday night in Shoreditch, East London, a group of girls from the North-West of the city were gathered outside the shady environs of a basement club. The scene is nothing out of the ordinary; there are men peacocking, women imitating young boys in asexual clothing and cropped hair,

Of a Saturday night in Shoreditch, East London, a group of girls from the North-West of the city were gathered outside the shady environs of a basement club. The scene is nothing out of the ordinary; there are men peacocking, women imitating young boys in asexual clothing and cropped hair, and some rather ubiquitous characters who can’t be identified as anything other than human. The aforementioned group of girls are talking amongst themselves, bemoaning that they don’t look ‘cool enough’ for the Hoxton scene surrounding them. For those of you who have been living on Mars for the past few years, you may not have had the pleasure of seeing “dick-heads are cool” see the link here.

 

The social commentary that constantly surrounds us is an all consuming occupation. Our innate need to belong or to identify with others is intrinsic to our very being. The issue of whether or not we are actually representing, or projecting, an image of how we want to be perceived is not a new concept. Yet, this in itself is worrying. How do we know who we really are if we spend our time cultivating an image of how we want to be rather than what accepting what is? The personal trajectory is a common theme for comedian Jackie Mason. His sketch of a patient visiting a psychologist is somewhat poignant – “How do I know that the therapist, I’m paying for, see’s the real me or the version I’m perpetrating; and if its the former will he pretend the latter to ensure his fee?”

 

To participate in a collaborative environment our instincts are to project our individual views so that they might be endorsed by others. The idea that they could be rejected as insubstantial or misaligned is a risk that very few people will engage in. However, it is exactly this criticism that will help us develop as individuals and for our ideas to become more accessible to wider audiences. If we have conviction in how we present ourselves to the world and the people in it then we are better prepared to innovate amongst ‘like-minded’ individuals. Paradoxically, we are then led to question whether the shared values presented are exactly that. Perhaps it is wiser to assume that this is the case otherwise very little will be achieved. Acceptance is a word often used by psychologists, and is thrown around without little regard to its actual meaning. Within this current climate, acceptance is something which has been toyed with but not really embraced. If we accept ourselves, the people with whom we integrate, and the world in which we inhabit – the task of innovation becomes a great deal more appealing. The conditions are right and the climate necessitates change. The algorithm might read

 

acceptance+change=innovation…mathematics never really was my strong point but I can accept that.